The Solution to the World Series Problem

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Saxon in Nashville

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The Solution to the World Series Problem
« on: July 06, 2006, 10:41:45 pm »
The "This time it counts" All-Star game is bad bad bad.

I have several ideas to create an advantage for one team or the other to gain home field advantage in the WS.

First a couple obvious choices:
1. Best overall record.  I like this for a couple reasons: first, it makes teams think through their season, especially if they think they can be contenders.  Second, it means every important player will have to play right up the bitter end of the season, since the difference of one game can mean it all (esp. if the world series representative ends up being a wildcard team)

2. Best interleague record (which hopelessly favors the AL right now), I hate interleague play, so I don't want thi implemented, but there is an intutitive snese of justice to it.

3. Best record within league opponents: I think this better, since it shows that a team is truly better amongst their own opponents and better deserves to be in the World Series.

A couple options I am suggesting

1. Best single pitcher record (meaning pitcher with most wins), since that pitcher is most likely to pitch the most games in the series, lets reward that team and that player by playing on his home field.

2. Most home runs in a season: its not like teams are going to mandate steroids, but let's get some excitment involved; conversely,

3. Team with the lowest opponent's runs-scored record, which would bring better pitching involved.

4. (My favorite) Best post-season record.  I know both teams will have eight wins going into the world series, but the team with the fewest losses should have an advantage.  It would create a buzz in the announcer booth, and in case of tie, weight the fewer League Championship loss stronger, so the team with fewer in that catagory (in case of a tie there, meaning exact records in the playofs to that point, just award it to the team with the most runs scored).  I love this, since it would create a whole new dynamic in the play-offs.

Sev in Ottawa

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2006, 06:10:11 am »
So you'd replace one stupid gimmick with another?

Spanky

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2006, 06:17:33 am »
Best interleague record (which hopelessly favors the AL right now), I hate interleague play, so I don't want thi implemented, but there is an intutitive snese of justice to it.

So you would take the American League, who is obviously better than the Nationals and automatically give them home field? Yeah that's fair. We can all go ahead and bet our life savings on the League with the best record after June.
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Saxon in Nashville

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2006, 06:39:43 am »
Brock, its just different ideas to replace the All-Star game winner.  I don't even like the overall interleague winner idea.  Its just a common solution

J - Dog

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2006, 06:40:29 am »
The "This time it counts" All-Star game is bad bad bad.

A couple options I am suggesting

1. Best single pitcher record (meaning pitcher with most wins), since that pitcher is most likely to pitch the most games in the series, lets reward that team and that player by playing on his home field.

2. Most home runs in a season: its not like teams are going to mandate steroids, but let's get some excitment involved; conversely,

3. Team with the lowest opponent's runs-scored record, which would bring better pitching involved.


and its One!...Two!.... Three strikes you're out!... at the... old... ball... gaaaaame...

1. what about good bullpens? another team might have weaker starting pitching and a better bullpen. Not a Fair stat to use.

2. Most Homeruns? :nono what about Small Ball teams?  Unfair stat

3. again, if you win 16 - 9 or 2-1, the only thing that matters is you won... Bad stat to use

Agreed that "This time it counts" is a bad , except now more hardcores  will be tuned in to see which league will get homefield, as opposed to the All-Star game being like a Pepsi sponsored Softball Tournament.

Sollution:
A mathmatical formula combining: teams regular season W - L record x Interleague record pct( AL vs NL). ..
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Santo

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2006, 07:17:24 am »
MLB is so fugged up.

Before the All-Star game 'counting', they used to alternate home-field advantage between the AL and NL.

I really find it hard to believe that the highest baseball league in the world can't figure out that the best way to award the best team in the majors is to give that team the home field advantage.

Hell, they do it in the Wild Card Round and Championship series.

But, what do you expect from a sport that allows pitchers to hit on 16 teams and not on 14. That is like allowing the AFC to play with 12 players on offense, except when they play a team from the NFC, where they will have to play 11.
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Dustin in Tulsa

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2006, 09:07:44 am »
I think we can make this simple.  Let's do like the other leagues and give home field advantage to the team with the best record.  Obviously the Bud made a desparation move when he went with the "This Time it Counts (:nono)" approach to the All-Star game.  The All-Star game is what it is, an exhibition of the best players (allegedly) in the game.  But since we're talking World Series here instead of All-Star game I digress.

Next step is to make MLB a Bud free game.  Ok, Budweiser is fine, but you see where I'm going.

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Newportdog

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2006, 10:44:09 am »
Isn't the NBA the only league where the records actually determine where the last game will be played? I'm also guessing that they're probably the 4th 'major' sports audience, so it's not like they're doing anything special.

The bast audience is the Super Bowl. Records determine homefield advantage, but the most important game is locationally predetermined.

The second largest audience is the NCAA tournament. Records help only with seeding and sometimes give those teams an advantage by being placed in a local pod to start the tournament. Again, the Finals are locationally predetermined.

That leaves us with baseball as the 3rd largest audience. What they do is essentially the same as basketball with the minor exception of the 7th game. Why is everyone so enraged at the format when the only other example is the poorest audience draw in all the major sports?

Hey, I'm the last to get in Selig's corner. I think he's a little kiss ass corporate faggot that would ,and probably has, lied to save his own skin. I'm guessing that someone in his office, with a greater brain than he, pitched the idea and I like it. All sports all-star games are complete s-hit. Baseball's has all the best actually playing for something that can realistically mean a championship for their fans.

Santo

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2006, 11:02:56 am »
The second largest audience is the NCAA tournament. Records help only with seeding and sometimes give those teams an advantage by being placed in a local pod to start the tournament. Again, the Finals are locationally predetermined.

Well, imagine that the NCAA tournament were NOT played on neutral courts, and that the home court advantage in the Final game were determined by the winner of the pre-season NIT tournament or the Alaskan Shoot-Out. That is what MLB is doing.

You really can't compare NCAA or the Super Bowl to what the MLB, NBA and NHL do. There is a major difference to a 'One and Done' tournament and a "Best of Seven' format.
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Newportdog

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2006, 12:25:07 pm »
The second largest audience is the NCAA tournament. Records help only with seeding and sometimes give those teams an advantage by being placed in a local pod to start the tournament. Again, the Finals are locationally predetermined.

Well, imagine that the NCAA tournament were NOT played on neutral courts, and that the home court advantage in the Final game were determined by the winner of the pre-season NIT tournament or the Alaskan Shoot-Out. That is what MLB is doing.

You really can't compare NCAA or the Super Bowl to what the MLB, NBA and NHL do. There is a major difference to a 'One and Done' tournament and a "Best of Seven' format.

I understand. My point was simply that MLB doesn't need to model itself after the playoff formats that are, from the standpoint of viewership, unsuccessful. Is determining game 7 as a result of the all-star game odd? Of course. However, it does add value to the outcome of the all-star game. None of the other sports offer that. Additionally, despite the fact that baseball, to a degree, starts it's playoffs with a record based format, it gives all four teams (in the winning league) the chance to compete knowing that each can gain home field advantage.

Furthermore, what's the point of an entirely record based system when there's such an obvious disparity in the strenght of the two leagues?  Is there really any equity in giving the Mets homefield advantage when they could potentially be the 7th best team in the AL?

Mark in Kansakhstan

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2006, 12:51:29 pm »
The All-Star game cannot be the determining factor when the method for selecting the All-Stars is such a farce.

In 1989, Mike Schmidt was hitting .203 with 6 HR in May and retired.  He still made the All-Star team.

Last year, Mike Piazza was the starting NL catcher.

The all-star game is a stupid popularity contest.

Additionally, the "all teams must be represented" rule gives the AL a pitcher with an ERA over 5.00.

Then we have the situation with Ozzie Guillen passing over many more deserving AL players so he could stack the team with guys from his own team.  Yeah, I know the Ozzie felicitators on this site will hammer me for that.  Fire away.

The All-Star game is a fun exhibition and should be left at that.

All things being equal, the home team in any baseball game has a 55.5% chance of winning.  This is too important of an advantage to base it on the outcome of something as recockulous the outcome of the All-Star game.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2006, 01:03:37 pm by Mark in Koreatucky »

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2006, 01:25:00 pm »
All things being equal, the home team in any baseball game has a 55.5% chance of winning.  This is too important of an advantage to base it on the outcome of something as recockulous the outcome of the All-Star game.

All things being equal, 6.25% of the teams in the NL have a winning record in interleague play.

David in H-Town

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Re: The Solution to the World Series Problem
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2006, 03:04:21 pm »
I think every 4 years they should incorporate the WC style and shorten the season for the World Baseball Classic during the middle of the season.  Everyone should be forced to participate if healthy and qualified to be on the squad (all star calliber)
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