Author Topic: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??  (Read 1856 times)

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Rob in VB

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2015, 01:46:44 pm »
Snake is"A fluent swimmer,A keen-eyed birdwatcher,Fond of his mother,Elegant,Built on an uncertain foundation, Fluttersome, A real jackdaw,Avowed bachelor"..
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Snakeeyes

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2015, 01:59:34 pm »
Most are religious morons.

There are already some GOP primary candidates saying vaccinations are a "parent's choice".  I'd be shocked if any Dems did that.

It, like most ignorance, is primarily a conservative position.
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Snakeeyes

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2015, 02:00:44 pm »
Snake is"A fluent swimmer,A keen-eyed birdwatcher,Fond of his mother,Elegant,Built on an uncertain foundation, Fluttersome, A real jackdaw,Avowed bachelor"..

Nice vIQ-style take. 
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Learjet89

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2015, 03:42:25 pm »
Most are religious morons.

Actually, most are affluent with advanced degrees

http://www.chicagomag.com/city-life/March-2014/Why-Is-Vaccine-Refusal-More-Prevalent-Among-the-Affluent/

Quote
During the 1980s and 1990s, undervaccination in the United States was primarily unintentional, associated with diminished access to health care, and was frequently observed among inner-city ethnic or racial minorities, inner-city families living in poverty, and children whose mothers had limited education. Outbreaks attributable to vaccine refusal tended to be observed among religious groups with objections to vaccination (eg, Christian Scientists and the Amish). In contrast, reluctance to vaccinate in the San Diego outbreak was associated with health beliefs, particularly among well-educated, upper- and middle-income segments of the population, similar to those seen in measles outbreak patterns elsewhere in 2008.
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Beavis in KC

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2015, 06:51:37 am »
 :popcorn
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testudo

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #35 on: May 27, 2015, 07:23:39 am »
:lol Snake being a bigoted asshole and getting pwnt by his boy.
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Dog

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2015, 11:21:55 am »
There are already some GOP primary candidates saying vaccinations are a "parent's choice".  I'd be shocked if any Dems did that.

It, like most ignorance, is primarily a conservative position.

Not true.  The places with the lowest vaccination rates are in predominately blue areas.  I assumed it was a right wingnut thing, but it's the naturalist, granola-eating hippies that promote the anti-vax bullshit.
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VicNocal

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2015, 11:41:21 am »
Wait, you mean to tell me Cakeeyes was once again spouting shit out of his dickhole (his mouth - get it? because he puts dicks in there) like a little know-it-all, but it turns out he was wrong, AGAIN?  Naaaaahh, get outta here.

/s/

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And a slew of other stupid shit this dumb kid has said that I can't recall right now


 :lol "Facts have a liberal bias"
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Spanky

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2015, 01:32:40 pm »
Not true.  The places with the lowest vaccination rates are in predominately blue areas.  I assumed it was a right wingnut thing, but it's the naturalist, granola-eating hippies that promote the anti-vax bullshit.

So you are saying Snakeeyes doesn't know what he's talking about? Strange, that never happens.
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John in Nashville

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2015, 02:05:16 pm »
Interesting...

http://www.advisory.com/Daily-Briefing/2013/08/08/The-states-with-the-best-and-worst-vaccine-coverage

Which states have the highest vaccination rates

Mississippi had the highest vaccination rates for all three conditions, with 99.9% of children receiving the MMR, DTaP, and varicella vaccines.

Broken down by vaccine, the states with the best MMR vaccine rates were:
1. Mississippi (99.9%);
2. Maryland (98.2%);
3. South Dakota (97.9%);
4. Texas (97.5%); and
5. Wyoming (97.5%).


Which states have the lowest vaccination rates

Meanwhile, the study found that Colorado and Arkansas had the lowest vaccination rates for the conditions.

Specifically, the states with lowest MMR vaccination rates were:
1. Colorado (85.7%);
2. Arkansas (85.9%);
3. Pennsylvania (87%);
4. Idaho (89%); and
5. North Dakota (89.9%).
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Spanky

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2015, 02:12:04 pm »
Wow, imagine that. Statistics do have a place in these types of arguments after all.
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Dog

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2015, 02:14:50 pm »
Wow, imagine that. Statistics do have a place in these types of arguments after all.

Not necessarily.  Vaccination requirements are a state by state issue.  Some states, like Idaho, let you send your kids to school unvaccinated as long as the parent signs a waiver stating that they philosophically don't believe in them.  Mississippi doesn't have that type of waiver.

So statistics can help, but they would help more if all states were uniform in their requirements.
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Snakeeyes

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #42 on: May 27, 2015, 05:24:00 pm »
From your own article, with the most recent facts:

Nor is the CDC panicking, with a caveat:

During 2013, nearly two thirds of the cases came from three outbreaks. In these outbreaks, transmission occurred after introduction of measles into communities with pockets of persons unvaccinated because of philosophical or religious beliefs. This allowed for spread to occur, mainly in households and community gatherings, before public health interventions could be implemented. Despite progress in global measles control and elimination, measles importations are likely to continue posing risks of measles outbreaks in unvaccinated communities.


And again, at least one GOP hopeful has announced he thinks vaccination should be a parent's choice.  Can you find any Democrats who have??
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Snakeeyes

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #43 on: May 27, 2015, 05:25:38 pm »
Not true.  The places with the lowest vaccination rates are in predominately blue areas.  I assumed it was a right wingnut thing, but it's the naturalist, granola-eating hippies that promote the anti-vax bullshit.

If the article is right, that's not by choice.  Yes, poor black mothers in inner cities don't have kids vaccinated, but they don't think it's because there's some old invisible man in the sky who doesn't want them to its for more obvious reasons.
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Snakeeyes

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Re: Huh. Do we know anybody like this??
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2015, 05:38:50 pm »
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/first-read/numbers-republicans-democrats-vaccination-debate-n298606

In the last 24 hours, the public debate over whether vaccinations for children should be mandatory has been overlaid with partisan politics, with both President Barack Obama and possible 2016 GOP candidate Gov. Chris Christie weighing in with different takes on the issue. In a pre-Superbowl interview with NBC News, Obama urged vaccination skeptics to "know the facts," while Christie had to backpedal after telling reporters he believes parents should have "a measure of choice" in the matter.

While vaccination skeptics don't fit into a single political categorization, a deeper dive into poll data can show us a little bit more about how Americans from both parties look at this issue.

A survey released last week from the Pew Research Center showed that 68 percent of US adults believe that vaccinations of children should be required, while 30 percent say that parents should be able to decide not to vaccinate their kids.

Education level, gender and income don't seem to make too much a difference in how Americans view vaccinations. But age does matter: 41 percent of young adults say that parents should have a choice about vaccinating their kids, while just 20 percent of seniors say the same.

Republicans and independents are more likely than Democrats to advocate against required vaccinations.


Thirty-four percent of Republicans and 33 percent of independents told pollsters that parents should be able to decide about vaccinations, versus just 22 percent of Democrats who said the same.

And, within the past five years or so, Republicans have become LESS likely to say vaccinations should be required, while Democrats are now MORE likely to advocate for the mandatory shots.




It's Chris Christie who came out for optional vaccinations.  I forget, is he Dem or GOP, vIQ??   :lol
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